Tag Archives: polio

hclPI02wTf8G4wRLtcUPJXGu3eTTIH31eyXsEf8LHmo

Syrian women risk their lives to protect children from polio

More than 200 Syrian women risk their lives every day to save the lives of children by teaching fellow mothers about the importance of polio vaccinations in the most hard-to-reach areas, including in Dar’a in the far south of Syria, and Aleppo in the northern part of the war-torn country. UNICEF works with local partners to train these women on holding educational sessions and delivering key messages to parents of the young children.

The fight against polio in Syria is one that goes beyond administering vaccinations – it also requires changing misconceptions, especially in the most inaccessible areas.

“Being a parent myself, makes me want to protect all the children of the world,” said Suzan, a mother of three and a volunteer in Dar’a. “I learned about the importance of vaccinations from a health worker, so I vaccinated my children. But what if other mothers did not? Why should the children suffer?” she asked, explaining her drive to help out.

A woman volunteer takes the stand at a mosque in Aleppo to teach gathered women on the importance of Polio vaccinations and their safety. ©UNICEF Syria/2015

A woman volunteer takes the stand at a mosque in Aleppo to teach gathered women on the importance of polio vaccinations and their safety. ©UNICEF Syria/2015

Suzan took advantage of any opportunity to reach out to mothers and give them critical information on protection from polio. While most of her work entailed holding informative sessions in shelters for the internally displaced people, she took innovative steps to spread her knowledge.

“During major water cuts, I’d approach women gathering to fill their cans with water and talk to them about vaccination and hygiene,” she said. “I can tell how responsive they were because they asked questions and interacted with me, especially young mothers.”

Working in hard to reach areas, the mission of these unsung heroes is dotted with challenges. According to the women, a deteriorating security situation, increased restrictions on the movement of women without a male companion and resistance against vaccinations in some parts of the country are among the obstacles they face on a daily basis.

“The violence in the area is making people hesitant to take their children to medical centres to get vaccinated,” said Jinan, a volunteer in Aleppo. Jinan noted another obstacle faced by the volunteers; the misperceptions of parents over the safety of the vaccinations.

“Parents were too scared to get their children vaccinated due to rumours,” she explained. “We clarified over and over again the credibility of the source and the importance of the polio vaccine until we convinced them.”

Despite challenges, these courageous and dedicated women are reaching out to as many mothers as possible – and getting them to vaccinate their children as a result.

A volunteer with UNICEF holds in-house sessions with mothers in Aleppo and distributes informative flyers on protection from polio. ©UNICEF Syria/2015

A volunteer with UNICEF holds in-house sessions with mothers in Aleppo and distributes informative flyers on protection from polio. ©UNICEF Syria/2015

“The most exciting thing is sharing your knowledge, then watching the mothers take actions based on it,” said Mariam, another community influencer in Aleppo. “One woman went and vaccinated her three children immediately after the information session”.

“Since the outbreak of polio in Syria in late 2013 that resulted in 36 recorded cases in the country, 15 massive vaccination campaigns supported by UNICEF have been rolled out combined with raising public awareness at the community level,” explained Hanaa Singer, UNICEF representative in Syria.

The campaigns reached more than 2.9 million children under the age of five across the country. Many were vaccinated several times. “We were able to reach some children living under siege or in areas hard-to-reach. However, we estimate that some 80,000 children continue to miss out on the life-saving vaccination,” warned Singer.

“Mothers listen and relate better to other mothers,” said Dr. Nidal Abou Rshaid, UNICEF immunization officer. “The volunteers’ role is extremely important because they are more capable of delivering the information.”

Yasmine Saker is a Communication and Reporting Consultant working with UNICEF Syria.

One-month-old Monyaguek from South Sudan is held by his mother while receiving a dose of oral polio vaccine.

A great day for Africa: polio nears its end

Today marks one year since we have had a case of the wild poliovirus anywhere in Africa, the last having been reported from Somalia with a date of onset of 11th August 2014.

What an extraordinary achievement and what a powerful symbol of the progress that has been made on the African continent over the past generation.

What got us to this point was not just a vaccine, it was the tireless work of hundreds of thousands of volunteers, traditional and religious leaders at community level, combined with the commitment and determination of national and local governments. On the global level it has involved a remarkable partnership between WHO, Rotary International, the Centres for Disease Control, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and UNICEF, backed by the generous contributions of many public and private donors.

A girl in Somalia holds out her hand to display her ink-marked finger, which demonstrates that she has been vaccinated against polio.

A girl in Somalia displays her ink-marked finger, demonstrating that she has been vaccinated against polio. © UNICEF/NYHQ2013-1318/Ohanesian

Last month we applauded Nigeria for having achieved a year without detection of the wild poliovirus, despite the enormous challenges posed by insecurity in the Northeast of the country. We have also seen polio outbreaks in Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea and the Horn of Africa halted, thanks to the professionalism, ingenuity and courage of UNICEF staff and our partners.

Globally, we are on the verge of totally eradicating a disease for only the second time in history – as we approach the General Assembly’s endorsement of the Sustainable Development Goals, what a wonderful time to be able to encourage the global community to set ambitious goals and to know that such goals can be met – if we believe.

In November I will end a career of nearly forty years in development. On the 15th of August 1977 I set off for Khartoum. In the months and years that followed I travelled extensively throughout Sudan – on the top of trucks, by train, at the wheel of a Land Rover on nearly impossible roads, and by paddle steamer down the Nile. During these journeys I gained an appreciation for the enormous size of the country and for the extraordinary hardship and isolation in which many of its population lived. I left Sudan in 1983, as the civil war was starting and returned in 2007, as Director of the UNICEF programme in the South of what was then still a united country.

In 2008 we had an outbreak of polio that originated in Jonglei State, close to the border with Ethiopia. It is hard to describe the isolation of this place – an area of marshes, vast cotton-soil plains that become impassable after rains, and an area that has long been plagued by insecurity. Despite all of these challenges – and ongoing insecurity and conflict to this day – the polio outbreak was contained and, what is now the independent nation of South Sudan, has not seen a single case of wild poliovirus since.

One-month-old Monyaguek from South Sudan is held by his mother while receiving a dose of oral polio vaccine.

One-month-old Monyaguek from South Sudan is held by his mother while receiving a dose of oral polio vaccine. © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2460/Sokol

Similar remarkable achievements across Africa have provided the basis for what we celebrate today.

While today’s milestone is extraordinary, it is not an endpoint. For Nigeria, two more years must pass without a case of wild poliovirus before it can finally be certified as polio-free, along with the rest of the African continent. To achieve this goal, Nigeria and the many other African countries that remain at risk for polio must maintain high-quality surveillance, work ever-harder to improve the quality of vaccination campaigns, and act decisively, should further outbreaks occur. They must also re-double their efforts to improve routine immunization.

With Africa now on track, we are left with only two countries where polio transmission has never been interrupted: Pakistan and Afghanistan. Here too, despite enormous challenges, communities, governments and partners are working with courage and determination to end polio once and for all: today’s anniversary in Africa gives us the faith to believe that they too can succeed.

Peter Crowley is the head of UNICEF’s Polio unit.

A girl in Somalia holds out her hand to display her ink-marked finger, which demonstrates that she has been vaccinated against polio.

Un gran día para África: se acerca el fin de la polio

El 11 de agosto hizo un año del último caso del virus poliomielítico salvaje registrado en toda África, que se detectó en Somalia el 11 de agosto de 2014.

Durante la última generación se han hecho logros extraordinarios, y el continente africano se ha convertido en un poderoso símbolo de progreso.

Esto ha sido posible no solo gracias a una vacuna, sino también al trabajo infatigable de cientos de miles de voluntarios, líderes tradicionales y religiosos a  nivel comunitario, combinado con el compromiso y la determinación de los gobiernos nacionales y locales. A escala global, este trabajo ha implicado una importante alianza entre la OMS, Rotary International, los Centros para el Control de Enfermedades, la Fundación de Bill y Melinda Gates y UNICEF, respaldados por las generosas contribuciones de numerosos donantes públicos y particulares.

En Somalia, una niña muestra su dedo lleno de tinta, lo que demuestra que la han vacunado contra la polio.

En Somalia, una niña muestra su dedo lleno de tinta, lo que demuestra que la han vacunado contra la polio. © UNICEF/NYHQ2013-1318/Ohanesian

El mes pasado aplaudíamos porque en Nigeria había transcurrido un año sin detectar ningún caso del virus poliomielítico salvaje, si bien sigue habiendo riesgos en el noreste del país. Por otra parte, gracias a la profesionalidad, el ingenio y la valentía de los miembros y aliados de UNICEF, hemos asistido a la detención de los brotes de la polio en Camerún, Guinea Ecuatorial y el Cuerno de África.

En el plano internacional, nos encontramos a punto de erradicar una enfermedad por segunda vez en la historia. Pronto tendrá lugar la aprobación de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible por parte de la Asamblea General, y qué mejor momento que este para animar a la comunidad internacional a establecer unos objetivos ambiciosos y saber que, con voluntad, lograremos conseguirlos.

En noviembre finalizará mi trayectoria de casi cuarenta años dedicados al desarrollo. El 15 de agosto de 1977 marché a Jartum. Durante los meses y los años posteriores recorrí Sudán a lo largo y a lo ancho, encima de camiones, en tren, en la rueda de un Land Rover por carreteras imposibles y a remo por el Nilo. Durante mis viajes tuve la oportunidad de apreciar las enormes dimensiones del país y las grandes dificultades y el aislamiento que sufren muchos de sus habitantes. Me fui de Sudán cuando empezó la guerra civil en 1983, y volví en 2007 como Director del programa de UNICEF para el Sur del que, por entonces, aún era un país unido.

En 2008 hubo un brote de polio con origen en el Estado de Junqali, cerca de la frontera con Etiopía. Es difícil describir el aislamiento que sufre este país, una zona llena de pantanos, terrenos de vertisoles que imposibilitan el tránsito tras las lluvias, y una zona en la que durante mucho tiempo ha reinado la inseguridad. A pesar de todas estas dificultades y de la inseguridad y el conflicto que permanece hoy en día, se consiguió frenar el brote de polio, y lo que hoy es la nación independiente de Sudán del Sur no ha vuelto a presentar un solo caso nuevo de poliomielitis.

En Sudán del Sur, una madre sostiene a su bebé Monyaguek, de un mes de edad, mientras le proporcionan una dosis de la vacuna oral contra la polio.

En Sudán del Sur, una madre sostiene a su bebé Monyaguek, de un mes de edad, mientras le proporcionan una dosis de la vacuna oral contra la polio. © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2460/Sokol

Otros logros parecidos ocurridos en distintas partes de África constituyen la base de la noticia que celebramos.

Aunque se trata de un hito incomparable, no significa que sea el fin de la enfermedad. En el caso de Nigeria, es necesario que transcurran dos años sin detectar un caso del virus poliomielítico antes de poder garantizar que están libres de polio, al igual que el resto del continente africano. Para conseguirlo, Nigeria y otros muchos países africanos que continúan padeciendo riesgo de sufrir nuevos casos de polio deben mantener una vigilancia de alta calidad y trabajar aún más para mejorar la calidad de las campañas de vacunación. Deberán actuar con decisión en caso de que surjan nuevos brotes, y tendrán que redoblar sus esfuerzos para optimizar las prácticas de inmunización.

Ahora que la situación de África parece haber tomado un buen rumbo, nos quedan solo dos países donde todavía no ha cesado nunca la transmisión de la polio: Pakistán y Afganistán. Allí, a pesar de las enormes dificultades, las comunidades, los gobiernos y los aliados trabajan con ahínco y determinación para erradicar la polio de una vez por todas. El aniversario que celebramos en África nos da motivos para creer que ellos también podrán conseguirlo.

Peter Crowley es el jefe de la unidad de UNICEF contra la Polio.

One-month-old Monyaguek from South Sudan is held by his mother while receiving a dose of oral polio vaccine.

Un grand jour pour l’Afrique : l’éradication de la polio est proche

Il y a un an aujourd’hui que le dernier cas de poliovirus sauvage a été détecté en Afrique. Le dernier signalement remonte au 11 août 2014 en Somalie.

Quelle réussite extraordinaire ! Voilà un vrai symbole des progrès accomplis sur le continent africain ces dernières années.

Mais ce n’est pas uniquement grâce à un vaccin que nous avons accomplis cette tâche ; c’est aussi grâce au travail inlassable de centaines de milliers de bénévoles, dirigeants traditionnels et religieux au niveau de la communauté, conjugués à l’engagement et la détermination des gouvernements locaux et nationaux. Sur le plan international, on compte de nombreux partenariats entre l’OMS, le Rotary International, les Centres for Disease Control, la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates et l’UNICEF, ainsi que de généreuses contributions provenant de donateurs publics et privés.

Une fille en Somalie montre une tâche d’encre sur son doigt, signe qu’elle a été vaccinée contre la polio.

Une fille en Somalie montre une tâche d’encre sur son doigt, signe qu’elle a été vaccinée contre la polio.© UNICEF/NYHQ2013-1318/Ohanesian

Le mois dernier, nous avons félicité le Nigéria pour avoir réussi à passer un an sans le moindre cas de polio sauvage, malgré les défis considérables posés par l’insécurité dans le nord-est du pays. Nous avons également constaté une interruption de l’épidémie de polio au Cameroun, en Guinée équatoriale et dans la Corne de l’Afrique, et cela grâce au professionnalisme, au savoir-faire et au courage du personnel de l’UNICEF et de ses partenaires.

Au niveau mondial, nous sommes sur le point d’éradiquer complètement une maladie pour la seconde fois dans l’histoire. En attendant l’approbation des Objectifs de développement durable par l’Assemblée générale, nous avons là une merveilleuse occasion d’encourager la communauté internationale à se fixer des objectifs ambitieux et reconnaître que de tels objectifs peuvent être atteints… si nous y croyons.

En novembre, je finis près de 40 ans de carrière dans le domaine du développement. Je suis parti pour Khartoum le 15 août 1977. J’ai beaucoup voyagé au Soudan au cours des mois et des années qui ont suivis (sur le toit des camions, en train, au volant d’une Land Rover sur des routes quasiment impraticables, ou à bord d’un bateau à aubes sur le Nil). Lors de ces voyages, j’ai pu apprécier l’étendue de ce grand pays mais j’ai aussi compris les épreuves et l’isolement subis par un grand nombre de sa population. J’ai quitté le Soudan en 1983 au moment où la guerre civile éclatait, et je suis revenu en 2007 en tant que Directeur des programmes de l’UNICEF dans la région sud du pays (encore unifié à l’époque).

En 2008, une épidémie de polio a fait son apparition dans l’État de Jonglei, près de la frontière éthiopienne. Il est difficile de décrire à quel point cette région est isolée : une grande étendue de marais, de vastes plaines pour la culture du coton qui deviennent infranchissables après la pluie, de grands espaces depuis longtemps en butte à l’insécurité. Malgré tous ces défis (insécurité et conflit en continu encore à ce jour), l’épidémie de polio a été contenue et pas le moindre cas de polio sauvage n’a été signalé dans ce pays, que nous connaissons aujourd’hui comme la nation indépendante du Soudan du Sud.

Monyaguek, âgée d’un mois, au Soudan du Sud, dans les bras de sa mère pendant qu’elle reçoit une dose de vaccin oral contre la polio

Monyaguek, âgée d’un mois, au Soudan du Sud, dans les bras de sa mère pendant qu’elle reçoit une dose de vaccin oral contre la polio © UNICEF/NYHQ2011-2460/Sokol

De telles réalisations extraordinaires, également observées un peu partout en Afrique, sont à l’origine de la célébration d’aujourd’hui.

C’est une étape importante mais le travail n’est pas terminé. Le Nigéria doit encore attendre deux ans sans le moindre cas de polio sauvage pour obtenir la certification « sans polio », tout comme le reste du continent africain. Pour atteindre cet objectif, le Nigéria – ainsi que tous les autres pays à risques – devront maintenir une surveillance forte, œuvrer plus que jamais à améliorer les campagnes de vaccination, et prendre des mesures décisives en cas de nouvelles épidémies. Tous les pays doivent redoubler d’efforts pour améliorer la vaccination de routine.

Maintenant que l’Afrique est sur le bon chemin, il ne reste que deux pays dans lesquels la transmission de la polio n’a jamais été interrompue : le Pakistan et l’Afghanistan. Malgré de nombreux défis dans ces deux régions, les communautés, les gouvernements et les partenaires travaillent avec courage et détermination pour éradiquer la polio une bonne fois pour toutes. L’anniversaire que nous fêtons aujourd’hui en Afrique nous donne raison de croire qu’ils peuvent y arriver, eux aussi.

Peter Crowley est responsable du programme polio de l’UNICEF.

© UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3272/Noorani

Polio vaccination and eradication – going beyond the drops

© UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3272/Noorani

A mother and child from Bangladesh. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3272/Noorani

Polio, once a disease feared around the world, has become a global success story for vaccines. Before the race for global polio eradication, children around the world were vulnerable to this devastating and incurable disease that often led to paralysis and permanent disability.

Polio cases have since been reduced by 99 per cent and the disease now survives only in the most underserved and marginalized communities where UNICEF and its partners continue to vaccinate children in an effort to eradicate the disease globally.

When we think of polio eradication, we imagine a mother cradling her child as a health care worker squeezes a drop of vaccine into an open mouth.

But the drops are just one piece of the puzzle.

UNICEF and its partners support the administration of the oral polio vaccine in areas where polio is endemic or outbreaks have occurred. The oral vaccine is extremely effective, but because it contains a weakened form of the live virus, it can – in exceedingly rare cases – turn into the disease itself. This mutated vaccine virus can be excreted in the environment and infect other children.

This is a very rare occurrence, but it is especially worrisome in communities where immunization coverage is incomplete as it puts children at risk of being paralyzed for life.

The only way to achieve complete polio eradication is to eventually stop using the oral, live polio vaccine altogether and to introduce the inactivated vaccine that does not contain a live virus nor the risk of vaccine-derived polio virus.

UNICEF, a founding partner of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative, is working with the 126 countries that are currently only using the oral version to begin introducing at least one dose of the inactivated vaccine into their immunization programmes by the end of 2015.

In 2014, efforts were focused on planning and preparing for the introduction of the inactivated vaccine. By the end of the year, 9 of 126 countries had introduced this vaccine, 116 countries had formally committed to its introduction, of which nearly 100 countries had developed introduction plans, and 66 of 72 eligible countries had been approved for financial support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.

Though we have come a long way, much remains to be done in 2015 for UNICEF and its partners to stay on track for polio eradication. The remaining countries relying only on the oral vaccine will need to introduce the inactivated vaccine by the end of this year, a feat made even more challenging by the need for these countries to start drafting implementation plans, communication strategies, and train staff in preparation for the eventual withdrawal of the oral vaccine.

Thanks to the countless polio workers worldwide, who have worked tirelessly for over a decade, polio eradication is now within reach as we prepare to make a global shift in the way we protect the world’s children from this disease. UNICEF and its partners have shown that global coordination for immunization saves lives as we strive to create a world where all children are able to be healthy and reach their full potential.

Meg Farrell is the IPV Coordinator in the Health Section at UNICEF Headquarters in New York.

BANA2014-00142

Vaccination antipolio et éradication de la maladie : au-delà des gouttes

Une

Une mère et un enfant au Bangladesh. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3272/Noorani

La polio, jadis une maladie redoutée dans le monde entier, est sur le point d’être vaincue, une réussite mondiale obtenue grâce aux vaccins. Avant la course menée pour l’éradication de la polio sur la planète entière, les enfants du monde entier étaient exposés à cette maladie dévastatrice et incurable qui se terminait souvent par la paralysie et un handicap permanent.

Les cas de polio ont été réduits de 99 % et la maladie ne survit à présent que dans les communautés défavorisées et marginalisées où l’UNICEF et ses partenaires continuent de vacciner les enfants dans le but d’éradiquer la maladie au niveau mondial.

Quand nous pensons à l’éradication de la polio, nous imaginons une mère en train de bercer son enfant dans ses bras tandis qu’un agent sanitaire dépose une goutte de vaccin dans sa bouche ouverte.

Mais ces gouttes de vaccin ne sont qu’un des aspects de la question.

L’UNICEF et ses partenaires participent à l’administration du vaccin oral antipolio dans les régions où la polio est présente à l’état endémique ou dans celles où des épidémies se sont produites. Le vaccin oral est extrêmement efficace mais, parce qu’il contient une forme atténuée du virus actif, il peut, dans des cas rarissimes, se transformer lui-même en maladie.  Ce virus utilisé pour le vaccin et ayant subi une mutation peut être transmis à l’environnement et infecter d’autres enfants.

Cela se passe très rarement mais cela est particulièrement préoccupant dans les communautés où la couverture vaccinale n’est pas totale, ce qui fait courir aux enfants le risque d’être paralysés à vie.

La seule façon de parvenir à une éradication totale de la polio et d’arrêter un jour l’utilisation à la fois du vaccin oral et du vaccin antipolio actif est d’introduire un vaccin inactivé ne contenant pas de virus actif et ne présentant pas les risques d’un vaccin antipolio obtenu à partir d’un virus.

L’UNICEF, un des cofondateurs de l’Initiative mondiale pour l’éradication de la poliomyélite, collabore avec les 126 pays n’utilisant actuellement que la version orale afin qu’ils commencent à introduire au moins une dose de vaccin inactivé dans leurs programmes de vaccination d’ici la fin 2015.

En 2014, les efforts on porté sur la planification et la préparation de l’introduction du vaccin inactivé. À la fin de l’année, sur les 126 pays, 9 avaient introduit le vaccin, 116 s’étaient officiellement engagés à l’introduire – 100 parmi ceux-ci ayant établi des plans d’introduction – et 66 des 72 pays pouvant en bénéficier se sont vu accorder une aide financière de la part de Gavi, l’Alliance mondiale pour les vaccins et la vaccination.

Bien que nous ayons réalisé d’importants progrès, beaucoup reste à faire en 2015 pour l’UNICEF et ses partenaires pour pouvoir rester sur la voie de l’éradication de la polio. Les derniers pays à compter seulement sur le vaccin oral devront introduire le vaccin inactivé d’ici la fin de l’année, un objectif d’autant plus difficile qu’il leur faut commencer à établir des plans de mise en œuvre, des stratégies de communication et de formation de leur personnel à la préparation d’un retrait final du vaccin oral.

Grâce aux innombrables agents de vaccination antipolio dans le monde qui œuvrent sans relâche depuis plus d’une décennie, l’éradication de la polio est à présent à portée de main alors même que nous nous préparons à effectuer un changement au niveau mondial dans la façon dont nous protégeons les enfants contre cette maladie. L’UNICEF et ses partenaires ont montré qu’une coordination internationale en faveur de la vaccination sauve des vies alors que nous faisons tout notre possible pour créer un monde où tous les enfants peuvent être en bonne santé et réaliser tout leur potentiel.

Meg Farrell est coordonnatrice « vaccin antipolio inactivé » à la section Santé du siège de l’UNICEF de New York.

A health worker wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) helps another health worker adjust the cap that is part of the protective gear she is also wearing, during a training session on Ebola. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3001/James

How to hunt a virus: 5 ways polio is helping fight Ebola

I’m often asked how the largest-ever public health movement – to end polio – has boosted the world’s ability to fight other deadly infectious diseases.

When I flew into Sierra Leone on 22 October to help tackle Ebola, I got to see for myself. Polio and Ebola are very different viruses that call for different responses, yet both have a disproportionate impact on the poorest and most vulnerable children. Both are stark reminders that we must strengthen fragile health systems. And for both, building trust and changing people’s behavior are at the very heart of a successful response.

Here are five ways the battle against polio is boosting the Ebola response:

1. Hunting the virus
Something we learned to do really well with polio, especially in India and Nigeria, is how to track the virus. You hunt the virus every day: where it’s going, where it’s coming from, and who it’s impacting.

To beat Ebola – just like polio – you need to understand the specific behaviors of people locally. Who is most vulnerable to infection? What are their behaviors? What’s driving these behaviours? By having the answers to these questions you can pinpoint the most strategic actions; cutting off the virus at its knees before it has the chance to run.

In Sierra Leone and other Ebola-affected countries, this has meant re-tasking the monitoring systems that were developed to make sure every child is reached with the polio vaccine – to track the impact of actions to fight Ebola. Systems that were developed to track acceptance and refusal of the polio vaccine are now helping gauge the speed and effectiveness of behavior change against Ebola.

In Liberia, UNICEF-supported social mobilizers from the group A-LIFE, learn to record survey data using their mobile phones.  © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-2031/Griggers

In Liberia, UNICEF-supported social mobilizers from the group A-LIFE, learn to record survey data using their mobile phones. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-2031/Griggers

2. Communication front and center 
For Ebola, there’s no vaccine and no cure. Basically, the only way to prevent more cases is to change how people care for the sick and how they bury those who have died. Communication and engagement are critical to ending the outbreak.

It is no easy task but the mechanisms developed for polio have meant that we can bring rigor to UNICEF’s lead role in this area. Rapid data on knowledge and perceptions around Ebola, for example, has allowed UNICEF to fine-tune SMS and other messaging by demographic, to reach the right members of the public with the right messages.

Religion is also important. Mapping and engaging religious influencers have been crucial to ending polio, and is now proving invaluable in the Ebola outbreak, where burial practices are contributing to very high levels of infection. Religious leaders are not only a voice for behavior change, but they also participate in many parts of the Ebola response. They may accompany burial teams or work in a prayer room at a community Ebola care center. This is similar to polio, where religious leaders don’t just influence people from a mosque, or send out fatwas in favor of the polio vaccine. They walk with the vaccination teams like they did in India. Or they’re at the local mosque, bringing children in to be vaccinated.

3. The “War Room” 
In Nigeria, Ebola was brought under control so quickly in part due to the replication of an Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) set up in 2012 to fight polio. An EOC is like a war room, where your strategy is determined minute by minute. All the data flows through there. All the work streams are coordinated there. It goes hand-in-hand with tracking the virus where it is – and moving coordination and management systems to where the virus is most deadly. So you have all the real-time information, all the knowledge, all the resources right there.

A health worker wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) helps another health worker adjust the cap that is part of the protective gear she is also wearing, during a training session on Ebola. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3001/James

A health worker wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) helps another health worker adjust the cap that is part of the protective gear she is also wearing, during a training session on Ebola. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3001/James

4. Trust can make or break the response
Trust is crucial to ending the Ebola outbreak as it is for polio. Drawing on polio’s framework of trust, we’ve tried to apply a similar approach to the Ebola response:

  • Do people trust the health workers in the community care centers?
  • Are they perceived to be playing a protective role in a community?
  • When people bring a sick loved one to the center, do they feel that it’s a safe place? Or does it seem like a foreign structure where people fear they may not see their loved ones again?
  • Is there a channel of communication between communities and services to make sure care centers incorporate their cultural beliefs?

It’s a continuous process of engagement, very much like it is with polio. We’re fighting this disease hand-in-hand with communities until it’s done.

5. Hope
Polio eradication represents hope. With strong leadership, innovation and persistence, we’re proving it’s possible to identify and reach every last child in the world, to influence closely-held community beliefs – and to stop a deadly virus in its tracks forever. Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea have all eradicated polio against great odds. With our support, they can end the Ebola outbreak too.

Sherine Guirguis is Senior Communications Manager for UNICEF’s Global Polio Programme.

In Liberia, UNICEF-supported social mobilizers from the group A-LIFE, learn to record survey data using their mobile phones.  © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-2031/Griggers

Comment faire la chasse à un virus : 5 manières dont la polio aide à lutter contre le virus Ebola

Retrouvez ici toutes les dernières informations sur le travail de l’UNICEF pour protéger les enfants et leurs familles dans les pays touchés par l’épidémie d’Ebola.

On me demande souvent de quelle manière l’opération de santé publique la plus large qui ait jamais été menée – celle destinée à mettre fin à la polio – a renforcé la capacité mondiale de lutter contre d’autres maladies infectieuses mortelles.

Quand je me suis rendue en Sierra Leone le 22 octobre pour aider à lutter contre le virus Ebola, j’ai pu constater par moi-même ce qu’il en était. Le virus de la polio et le virus Ebola sont des virus très différents qui demandent des réponses différentes, tous les deux touchent néanmoins de manière disproportionnée les enfants les plus pauvres et les plus vulnérables. Ces deux virus sont un rappel dramatique que nous devons renforcer les systèmes de santé les plus fragiles. Et dans les deux cas, obtenir la confiance des gens et chercher à modifier leurs comportements est au cœur même du succès d’une intervention.

Il y a cinq manières dont la lutte contre la polio renforce l’intervention contre le virus Ebola :

1. Manière de faire la chasse au virus
Une chose que nous avons appris à faire vraiment très bien dans le cas de la polio, spécialement en Inde et au Nigéria, est la façon de dépister le virus. Vous faites la chasse au virus tous les jours : où est-ce qu’il se répand, d’où vient-il, qui touche-t-il ?

Pour vaincre le virus Ebola – exactement comme pour la polio – vous devez comprendre les comportements spécifiques à la population locale. Qui est le plus vulnérable à l’infection ? De quelle manière les gens se comportent-ils? Qu’est-ce qui motive ces comportements ? Obtenir les réponses à ces questions vous permet de déterminer précisément les actions les plus stratégiquement importantes ; et de faucher le virus avant qu’il ait le temps de prendre sa course.

En Sierra Leone et dans les autres pays touchés par le virus Ebola, cela a voulu dire réorienter les dispositifs de suivi qui avaient été mis au point pour s’assurer que tous les enfants sans exception bénéficient du vaccin contre la polio – afin de pouvoir contrôler les effets des actions entreprises pour lutter contre le virus Ebola. Les dispositifs qui avaient été conçus pour suivre l’acceptation et le refus du vaccin contre la polio aident maintenant à mesurer la rapidité et l’efficacité des changements de comportement face au virus Ebola.

Au Libéria, des agents de mobilisation de l’organisation A-LIFE soutenue par l’UNICEF apprennent à enregistrer des résultats d’enquête en utilisant leur téléphone portable.  © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-2031/Griggers

Au Libéria, des agents de mobilisation de l’organisation A-LIFE soutenue par l’UNICEF apprennent à enregistrer des résultats d’enquête en utilisant leur téléphone portable. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-2031/Griggers

2. Communication tous azimuts
Face au virus Ebola, il n’existe pas de vaccin et pas de remède. Fondamentalement, la seule façon d’empêcher les cas d’infection de se multiplier est de changer la manière dont les gens s’occupent des malades, et la manière dont ils enterrent ceux qui sont morts. Communication et détermination active jouent un rôle crucial pour pouvoir mettre fin à l’épidémie.

Ce n’est pas une tâche facile, mais les mécanismes mis au point contre la polio ont montré que nous pouvons apporter la rigueur nécessaire au rôle pilote que l’UNICEF joue dans ce domaine. L’acquisition rapide de données sur les connaissances et les perceptions concernant le virus Ebola ont par exemple permis à l’UNICEF de raffiner ses SMS et ses autres formes de messages en fonction des différents groupes de la population, de façon à toucher le public approprié au moyen des messages appropriés.

La religion est aussi importante. Recenser et contacter les personnalités religieuses influentes a été crucial pour mettre fin à la polio et se révèle aujourd’hui très précieux face à l’épidémie du virus Ebola où les pratiques d’inhumation contribuent aux niveaux d’infection très élevés. Les personnalités religieuses n’apportent pas seulement une voix favorable aux changements de comportement, elles sont également parties prenantes de nombreuses actions menées contre le virus Ebola. Il peut s’agir d’accompagner les équipes chargées des inhumations, ou de travailler dans un lieu de prière dans un centre de soins pour les victimes du virus. Ceci est similaire à la campagne contre la polio où les notables religieux ne se limitent pas à influencer la population qui se rend à la mosquée ou à lancer des fatwas en faveur du vaccin contre la polio. Ils accompagnent les équipes de vaccination comme ils l’ont fait en Inde. Ou encore ils amènent les enfants de la mosquée locale pour être vaccinés.

3. La « salle des opérations »  
Au Nigéria, le fait que le virus Ebola a été maîtrisé aussi rapidement est en partie dû à la mise en place d’un centre des opérations d’urgence sur le modèle de celui organisé en 2012 pour lutter contre la polio. Un tel centre joue le rôle d’une « salle des opérations » où votre stratégie est définie minute par minute. Toutes les données y aboutissent. Toutes les tâches y sont coordonnées. Son action est accompagnée par le pistage du virus – et par le déplacement des dispositifs de coordination et de gestion vers les lieux où le virus fait le plus de ravages. Vous avez ainsi des informations en temps réel, toutes les connaissances, toutes les ressources à portée de la main.

Un agent de santé revêtu d’un équipement de protection individuelle (EPI) aide un autre agent à ajuster le capuchon qui fait partie de cette tenue de protection dont elle est également équipée au cours d’un exercice d’entraînement pour la lutte contre le virus Ebola. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3001/James

Un agent de santé revêtu d’un équipement de protection individuelle (EPI) aide un autre agent à ajuster le capuchon qui fait partie de cette tenue de protection dont elle est également équipée au cours d’un exercice d’entraînement pour la lutte contre le virus Ebola. © UNICEF/NYHQ2014-3001/James

4. La confiance : facteur dont peut dépendre la réussite ou l’échec de l’intervention
Inspirer la confiance est crucial pour mettre fin à l’épidémie du virus Ebola comme pour la polio. Tirant les leçons du cadre mis en place pour créer un climat de confiance dans le cas de la polio, nous avons essayé d’appliquer une démarche similaire dans la campagne contre le virus Ebola.

  • Est-ce que la population fait confiance aux agents sanitaires qui opèrent dans les centres de soins communautaires ?
  • Sont-ils perçus dans une communauté comme ayant un rôle de protection?
  • Quand les gens amènent un être cher pour être soigné à un de ces centres, ont-ils l’impression que c’est un endroit sans danger ? Ou est-ce qu’il apparaît comme une structure étrangère où les gens redoutent de ne plus revoir ces êtres chers ?
  • Existe-t-il une filière de communication entre les communautés locales et les services sanitaires pour assurer que les centres de soins tiennent compte des croyances et de la culture locales ?

C’est un processus de concertation continu, très similaire à l’action contre la polio. Nous luttons pied à pied avec les communautés touchées par cette maladie jusqu’à son élimination totale.

5. L’espoir
L’éradication de la polio est un symbole d’espoir. Grâce à une impulsion vigoureuse, à l’esprit d’innovation et à notre persistance nous prouvons qu’il est possible d’identifier et d’atteindre jusqu’au dernier enfant à travers le monde, d’influencer les croyances communautaires les plus intimes – et de donner un coup d’arrêt définitif à la propagation d’un virus mortel. Le Libéria, la Sierra Leone et la Guinée sont trois pays qui ont éliminé la polio en déjouant de fortes probabilités défavorables. Avec notre soutien, ils peuvent également réussir à mettre fin à l’épidémie du virus Ebola.

Sherine Guirguis est Directrice principale des communications pour le programme mondial contre la polio de l’UNICEF.

Touma a health worker in Chad vaccinates a small child.

Vaccination des enfants – comment relancer notre action ?

Vaccination d’un enfant dans le village de Sadar Shah au Pakistan. © UNICEF/PAKA2014-00354/Zaidi

Vaccination d’un enfant dans le village de Sadar Shah au Pakistan. © UNICEF/PAKA2014-00354/Zaidi

La vaccination est un moyen extrêmement efficace bien que très simple de protéger le droit fondamental des enfants à survivre et à jouir d’une bonne santé. Divers vaccins permettent de protéger les enfants de moins de cinq ans contre des maladies qui sont une menace potentielle pour leur survie et de sauver jusqu’à trois millions de vies chaque année.

Le rapport d’activité du Plan d’action mondial pour les vaccins du PAMV (lien en anglais)  – la feuille de route pour atteindre une couverture vaccinale universelle d’ici 2020 – montre que la progression des taux de vaccination s’est ralentie. Ce rapport met en lumière des lacunes persistantes de la couverture vaccinale qui mettent en danger la vie de millions d’enfants, plus spécialement les enfants les plus vulnérables et les plus marginalisés.

Près d’un cinquième des enfants à travers le monde sont encore privés de l’administration des vaccins les plus essentiels, ce qui leur pose un risque mortel. Ce sont les enfants les plus pauvres et les plus marginalisés dans le monde qui ne bénéficient toujours pas de la vaccination et pourtant ce sont eux qui en ont le plus grand besoin. Comment se fait-il que quelque chose d’aussi crucial puisse encore être hors de la portée de tant d’enfants ?

Manquer la cible – un programme essentiel pour la santé des enfants qui reste inachevé
Le ralentissement des progrès réalisés vers cinq des six cibles du PAMV montre l’on est mal partis pour les atteindre et que nous risquons de ne pas réussir à procurer une couverture vaccinale à tous les enfants. Parmi les cibles qui n’ont toujours pas été atteintes se trouve l’élimination de maladies potentiellement mortelles comme le tétanos maternel et néonatal, la rougeole et la rubéole.

Nous n’avons pas non plus mis fin à la propagation des nouvelles formes d’infection par la polio. La période de 2011 à 2013 a vu très peu d’améliorations dans la couverture nationale par le triple vaccin contre la diphtérie, le tétanos et la coqueluche – un indicateur crucial du succès éventuel de ce plan. Un tiers des pays dans le monde n’ont toujours pas atteint la cible de vaccination de 90 % de leur population enfantine par les trois doses nécessaires à l’administration de ce vaccin vital.

Touma (45 ans) est un agent de santé tchadien. Une vétérane de la lutte contre la polio, Touma travaille comme agent sanitaire de première ligne depuis 1988.

Touma (45 ans) est un agent de santé tchadien. Une vétérane de la lutte contre la polio, Touma travaille comme agent sanitaire de première ligne depuis 1988..
© UNICEF/PFPG2014P-0954/

Une action à relancer 

Les causes de ce manque de progrès sont complexes et comprennent des ressources insuffisantes, un rang de priorité trop bas, des approvisionnements irréguliers et des prix élevés. Le rapport d’activité mentionné indique cependant clairement les solutions à adopter pour remettre le programme sur la bonne voie. Bien que nous risquions de ne pas pouvoir respecter les délais fixés par le PAMV, il n’est pas trop tard pour continuer à élargir notre action vitale de vaccination et pour réactiver notre engagement de parvenir à une couverture vaccinale universelle.

Pour pouvoir protéger les 21 millions d’enfants qui n’étaient pas encore vaccinés en 2013, il faut que les pays concernés et leurs partenaires renforcent leur engagement à donner une plus grande priorité aux programmes de vaccination et à accroître leur financement, ce qui permettra d’améliorer la couverture vaccinale et la gestion des approvisionnements en vaccins.

La première chose à faire est d’atteindre les enfants qui restent privés de toute vaccination ainsi que de protéger ceux dont la vaccination est insuffisante. Cette action implique de renforcer le système sanitaire global pour disposer de suffisamment d’agents de santé qualifiés et d’établissements de santé adaptés, ainsi que d’améliorer la documentation de l’action sanitaire et les capacités de la chaîne du froid. La mesure la plus essentielle est cependant l’affirmation de la volonté politique : ces cibles peuvent toutes être atteintes si les pays concernés leur accordent la priorité nécessaire.

Le succès du PAMV est véritablement une question de vie ou de mort; 1,5 million d’enfants continuent à mourir chaque année de maladies qui peuvent être évitées par des vaccins. Réaffirmer notre engagement à réaliser les objectifs de ce plan permettra de faire de la couverture vaccinale universelle une réalité pour les générations futures, de préserver d’innombrables vies et d’aider les enfants du monde entier à réaliser leur plein potentiel.

Jos Vandelaer est Chef du programme de vaccination de la Division des programmes du Siège de l’UNICEF.

Pour en savoir plus sur le travail de l’UNICEF, visitez : www.unicef.org/french/

feature

Between a rock and a hard place: Iraq’s displaced children

I got on the plane to Erbil not knowing what to expect. I had mixed feelings about going back to Iraq, a country I worked in for more than three years. When I left in 2012, I thought Iraq was in a pretty good shape, I guess I was wrong.

The drive from Erbil to a town only 9 KMs away from Mosul was long. It was over 40 degrees, a typical summer day. I thought to myself “I did not miss this”.

We arrived to the town and went straight to meet families who fled the violence in Mosul just a few days before.

Ramez, a fragile 65 year old man was sitting on the floor of a room provided by the local community. He fled with his wife, sister, son and granddaughter (14). “I never expected this would happen to me. I never fled my home even during the harshest of times that Iraq went through” he said. “We walked for hours. I don’t know how we made it. I was especially worried for my wife who is very sick”. His wife Randa showed me the medications she takes. She was worried that she would run out. Even if she finds a pharmacy in the remote town, she would not be able to afford it. Ramez put out a 250 fils note (less than 25 US cents) and said “this is all I have left”.

Iraq has been going through turmoil and despair for more than three decades. Wars, sanctions, sectarian violence and economic stagnation drove millions of people out of their homes and now it was happening all over again. Driving back, Abdu, a UNICEF colleague who is about 30 years old said “All I remember of my whole life is problems, conflict, fear and instability”.

A few days later we got a call that families were arriving to Erbil fleeing another wave of violence. We immediately jumped in a car and went to meet them. Raed fled with his wife and three children from Qaraqosh, 20 minutes away from Mosul. His wife Hiba said “There were seven of us tucked in one small car. We left because my eight year old daughter Diana would not stop crying. She was really very scared of the sound of bombing”.

Like Ramez, Raed was in shock that he has become displaced. “My town was always known to host people running away from violence from all over Iraq. We used to provide them with food, houses, and schooling for their children. And now, we became those exact same people in need. I just can’t believe this”.

I met the family in a facility provided by the local church where four families were crowded in a big room with mattresses.  Hiba said “We fled with nothing but the clothes on our bodies. I don’t have anything here and I really wish I could have a shower”.

I thought about how important the hygiene kits UNICEF was providing were. A box with soap, shampoo and towels. When you’re displaced like Hiba, these could be life-saving and help people like Hiba stay clean.

Riva, displaced girl in Iraq in school turned public shelter for the internally displaced  @UNICEF/2014/Touma

Riva, displaced girl in Iraq in school turned public shelter for the internally displaced
@UNICEF/2014/Touma

The following day we rushed off to Al-Qosh (45 KMs from Mosul) to meet more displaced families. In a school turned shelter I came across a little girl eating an ice cream. She looked carefree and somewhat happy. “We arrived here this morning. I was really scared” Riva (8) said. She was clinging to Saad, her father. “We felt threatened and we left without thinking. I’m worried about tomorrow. I’m worried about tonight actually. Where will we sleep and how will I keep my family safe?” Saad said.

The school, a secondary boys’ school was crowded. All of the displaced came from the same place. Sami, a local, who was about 14 years old was helping to clean up. He said he was helping because he wanted people to feel at home and welcome.

Although a number of camps have been set up, most of the displaced people are staying with host families, taking refuge in relatives and friends’ houses, or in public and religious institutions like mosques and churches. I was humbled by the generosity of the people and how welcoming and organized they were with the little resources they had in the first place.

A few kilometers away from the school, the local health centre was holding a special vaccination campaign for the displaced children. Children arrived with their families to get the two drops against polio. Polio has sadly returned to Iraq after 14 years and UNICEF with partners mobilized not just the delivery of the much needed vaccines but also the medical staff and awareness raising among the community.

Rosa, a displaced girl from Mosul in Iraq, shows her finger-marking after being vaccinated against polio, Al-Qosh Iraq @UNICEF/2014/Touma

Rosa, a displaced girl from Mosul in Iraq, shows her finger-marking after being vaccinated against polio, Al-Qosh Iraq
@UNICEF/2014/Touma

Rosa (4) bravely sat on the chair, opened her mouth and got the vaccine. She then smiled happily as her finger was being marked. She arrived from Mosul a few days before. Her father who ran a small super market in their town said “We left in such a rush, I don’t think I locked up the supermarket. I’m sure it’s looted and I’m worried that I lost everything I had”

As we were leaving a woman stopped me. She was displaced as well and came to the clinic to vaccinate her children. “I’m really thankful that you came to see us. It really means a lot to us that there are people out there who care about us”.

We drove back to Erbil where a dedicated UNICEF team is working tirelessly running a large humanitarian response to help the people in need. I thought about what we’ve done so far: 100,000 litres of water, 3,500 hygiene kits, 1.2 million doses of polio procured. This is the little we can do to help people get by and hopefully return home soon when the wave of violence ends.

I thought about how much more we still need to do amid the growing needs and if we would be able to continue. A dollar figure kept popping up reminding me that we are short of 36 million US$. If we don’t get the funds we urgently need, many people will suffer even more.

Juliette Touma is a Communications & Media Specialist with the UNICEF Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa.