Tag Archives: child rights

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

#TuVozCuenta con U-Report México

¿Se imaginan qué increíble sería si pudiéramos preguntarle a los jóvenes sobre sus intereses, opiniones y necesidades en los lugares donde viven, y que pudiéramos obtener y analizar esa información en tiempo real? Imagínense que estuviéramos diseñando un programa que ayudara a los jóvenes a conseguir empleo después de sus estudios. Bueno, pues para ello, no sólo requeriríamos información estadística y diagnósticos de la situación de la educación y el mercado laboral; sino que también necesitaríamos conversar con muchos jóvenes para entender sus aspiraciones e ideales, temores y angustias, entender los retos a los que se enfrentan y la presión que muchas veces sentimos. De esta forma, podríamos lograr empatía con sus experiencias, pensamientos y emociones; y así diseñar un programa que los entienda y apoye de la mejor forma posible.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

Este proceso de consulta llevaría muchísimo tiempo, por lo que en muchas ocasiones, los programas se diseñan tomando sólo en cuenta la información de diagnósticos y estudios hechos por especialistas. Lamentablemente, por falta de tiempo, muy pocas veces se les pregunta a los jóvenes qué es lo que quieren, cómo lo quieren y por qué lo quieren así.

El pasado jueves 13 de agosto, como parte de las celebraciones del Día Internacional de la Juventud, compartimos con cientos de jóvenes la buena noticia de que U-Report había llegado a México. Con U-Report los jóvenes de más de 17 países en el mundo están utilizando la misma tecnología que usan para comunicarse entre amigos para participar con sus ideas y opiniones en el desarrollo de sus comunidades y de sus países.

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeño

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeño

U-Report permite a UNICEF, y a sus aliados en México, consultar en tiempo real a los jóvenes sobre lo que sucede en sus comunidades, los servicios que reciben, los temas públicos que son de su interés, sus necesidades y expectativas. Esta valiosa información se recibe, analiza y procesa en segundos, para generar un reporte que es entregado a las personas que están tomando las decisiones públicas que tienen efecto en la vida de todos los jóvenes mexicanos. De esta forma, U-Report ayuda a tomar decisiones más informadas, a diseñar servicios y programas públicos que tomen en cuenta la visión, opiniones e intereses de los jóvenes.

Ese jueves, el auditorio se llenó del entusiasmo de cientos de personas que participaron con novedosas ideas para enfrentar los retos en educación, salud, bienestar económico y convivencia social que viven los jóvenes en México. A partir de ese momento, cientos de jóvenes se hicieron U-Reporters y serán embajadores de este movimiento por el cual nuestra voz adquiere el súper poder de unirse a millones más para que sea escuchada fuerte y clara donde quiera que sea.

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeño

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeño

Jaime Archundia es Responsable de Innovación de UNICEF México

Únete a U-Report México 

Sígue a UNICEF México en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

2015-06-23_Haiti_Jacmel_Dieulande (75)_edited

Putting the spotlight on children’s lives in Haiti

11-year-old Djolanda sits outside her home.

11-year-old Djolanda sits outside her home. (c) UNICEF Haiti/2015/Walther

Jacmel, in Haiti’s South East and its surroundings are a picture of Caribbean beauty, with white beaches, azure-blue ocean, and dazzling sunshine. On the other hand and in the midst of this tropical treasure, children and their families struggle every single day to make ends meet.

I was recently in Jacmel to visit the Cine Institute, a Haiti-based organization that trains young Haitians who aspire to become film-makers. It is the only film academy in Haiti and it is bursting with talent. The partnership that brings UNICEF and the Cine Institute together is new and exciting in its approach because it seeks to place children’s voices at the center of storytelling. Our shared ambition is to put the spotlight on those who usually live at the margins of society, and yet who master every single day with bravery and imagination.

Weeks of scouting by the film-makers resulted in a whole list of prospective stories illustrating the resilience of Haitian children when faced with challenges. Edile (13) and Djolanda (11) were chosen for the video project that will be the beginning of a new storytelling philosophy. Their living conditions are a far cry from the principles that are enshrined in the International Convention of the Rights of the Child, which was ratified by Haiti 20 years ago, declaring that children must have access to everything they need to survive and thrive.

13-year-old Edile makes his way home.

13-year-old Edile makes his way home. (c) UNICEF Haiti/2015/Walther

Every child has the right to go to school and to play, they have the right to not be enrolled in labor. Yet while we can never condone that children are working, we must be aware that this remains the reality for thousands of children today. Awareness is the first step to change and UNICEF is working hand-in-hand with the Government towards a country where the words of the Convention become tangible. Edile’s and Djolanda’s stories illustrate that we must push further.

Who are they?

Edile stays with his father and his sister, who lives with disability. His mother left the family two years ago and has since re-married. Suffering from hypertension since having a stroke in 2013, his father is no longer able to work. To contribute to the meager family income, Edile decided to make some money by working three half-days in the neighborhood bakery.

Edile and his father sit outside their house.

Edile and his father. (c) UNICEF Haiti/2015/Walther

With his small earnings, he manages to take care of his father and to put some money aside for schooling. It is tough, and he missed the last school year due to insufficient funds, yet he keeps trying, every single day, aware that education is crucial for his future. His dream is to become an agronomist. “So many people go hungry here. I want to feed the country,” he says. “I hope that adults who see this video will do more to bring all children into school.”

Djolanda’s father abandoned the family when she was very young. Her mother raised the girl and her brother on her own, on a very tight budget. Djolanda matured quickly through witnessing her mother’s struggles for years. She is concerned for her mom and feels that she must learn to help provide for the family. Every day she goes to school, giving her best to be the best. But she does not stop there. Persisting in her quest, she found a local association which teaches sewing classes for adults and signed up.

The inside of Djolanda's home.

The inside of Djolanda’s home. (c) UNICEF Haiti/2015/Walther

Every evening after school, Djolanda is learning dressmaking, surrounded by women in their 40s and 50s. She has been enrolled in the course for several months now and already made a number of dresses, including her school uniforms. Djolanda has two dreams: she want to become a nurse to help people who are sick, and she aspires to save enough money to build a house for her mother. “My mom is the only one who takes care of us. I am worried about her health. There is a lot of disease around here..”

Edile and Djolanda are just two of many, yet they exemplify the courage and hope that propel Haitians at all ages forward. They do not wait for help. And yet they have the right to get as much support as possible. To bring children like Edile and Djolanda further on the way towards education, health and happiness we must do whatever we can. Every girl and every boy has the same rights, no matter where s/he was born and lives. The story of poverty and inequality sounds different from their perspective; because the narrative changes – from misery to hope, inspiring action, not pity.

Please stay posted for updates and the finalized videos.

Cornelia Walther is the Chief of Communication at UNICEF Haiti

Balika Sangha Girls Collective, Mangalore: A adolescence girls collective is formed in the village which meets at a community center to discuss issues and create awareness among the adolescence. They pledge solidarity and protection for every girl child in the area. They also involve government officials, elected village representative and local NGOÕs to support them.

Reflections on global realities and action to stop violence against women and girls

I have worked for UNICEF for over 30 years in Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Eastern Caribbean, Indonesia and now India.

Though across each of these countries and regions there are many differences, one common thread, sadly, is the continued violence and discrimination against women and girls. The numbers and context may vary in each of these countries, but the challenges that these women and girls face are quite similar. This is in spite of the national and international commitments of the governments and our common humanity.

In each of the countries in which I have worked, I can immediately remember the face and the name of some victims of gender-based violence and also of women and men who courageously and persistently struggled to end such unacceptable violations of human rights. These are etched into my mind forevermore.

To cite one such case, while working with UNICEF in Afghanistan, I was part of the first UN fact-finding mission in the Shomali Valley, during the Taliban period, and heard first-hand accounts of bereaved and shocked families whose young daughters were raped and taken away.

In my years of working on children and women’s rights issues, I have had the privilege of meeting and working with remarkable brave and inspiring child and women’s rights activists who I will also never forget and whom I try to honour each and every day.

And now that I have been working as the UNICEF Chief of Field Office of Uttar Pradesh (UP) in India for over 18 months, all the earlier memories and experiences keep resonating in UNICEF’s work in this state of 210 million people.

Living and working in the state capital, Lucknow, or traveling across the state, I hear almost every day of unacceptable violence against girls and women. Daily reports are coming through in the media and in discussions with our partners and networks about human rights and child rights violations, as well as about discrimination, exclusion and stereotyping across caste, religion, poverty groups and geographic location. According to the National Crime Records Bureau of India, for example, a crime against a woman is committed every three minutes!

Despite the progress in India over the past decades, when it comes to various aspects of social and economic development, the reality on the ground continues to alarm and shake us all each and every day when I or my colleagues travel to the districts.

For example, in India, 47% of girls aged 20-24 are married before the age of 18 as per the UNICEF State of the World’s Children Report. According to the International Centre for Research on Women (2007), girls who were married before the age of 18 were twice as likely to report being beaten, slapped or threatened by their husbands than girls who married later.

As a UNICEF team leader in one of the world’s largest field Office, I have committed to further push myself, my colleagues and our partners in understanding and mainstreaming gender across all the work at hand. I have, specifically, strived to strengthen our collaboration with social and cultural activists, promoting gender equality issues through a variety of platforms, including literary festivals.

Along with civil society and media partners, the team in UP has contributed to raise awareness and engagement on violence against girls and women through roundtable discussions, workshops, research and campaigns like #ENDviolence or, more recently, the #HeForShe campaign, for which we have joined hands with UNWOMEN.

Violence comes in different shapes and forms: physical, emotional, psychological and verbal violence are some of them, and all are painful and unacceptable. It happens anywhere: in homes, institutions, schools, health care centers, public areas, and work places.

There are also less evident representations of violence. For example, when improving the standards in labour rooms or training the staff working in these rooms, are we also looking at it from the eyes of the mother’s dignity and rights? Do we keep in mind how a delivering mother would feel?

As they stand now, most labour rooms in Uttar Pradesh lack basic and functioning facilities, including soap, running clean water and sanitary toilets among others. In addition to overcoming the afore-mentioned shortcoming, I strongly feel that we need to also focus on the rights and dignity of mothers in labour rooms and we are now beginning to shift our mindset in that direction.

I personally get inspired every day by the struggles of the many known and unknown champions of gender equality in Uttar Pradesh, India and internationally. These include some of the young girls in the UNICEF-supported adolescent girls’ peer groups who have proactively stopped cases of child marriage in their own communities. There is so much to learn from all of them!

So, let’s stop for a second and visualize that vulnerable child that all of us has seen more than once. In my case, and given the place where I live and work, I would probably see a girl, from the lowest income quintile, rural-based most likely, from a scheduled caste and disabled. It is her harsh reality and her right to have a better life what has to motivate and inspire us to do more. Let us work towards a more equitable world wherein no child is left behind.

Niloufar Pourzand is the Chief of the Uttar Pradesh Field office, UNICEF India Country Office

Facade of the Ospedale degli Innocenti, Florence, Italy

25 years of research on child rights at Ospedale degli Innocenti

UNICEF is well known for its role in responding to complex humanitarian crises affecting children around the world. The work of the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti, based at the 600-year-old Ospedale degli Innocenti, in Florence, Italy rarely hits world headlines. Yet over the quarter century of its existence UNICEF at Innocenti has produced ground-breaking analytical work which has informed action and shifted global development discourse on critical child rights issues.

In order to mark its 25th Anniversary, the Office recently convened a special anniversary seminar to reflect on achievements and look toward future directions for research at Innocenti. In its historic Renaissance surroundings former directors and senior researchers, together with a constellation of local and national Italian partners, shared their experiences and insights. On behalf of the Italian Government, the Office’s most generous financial donor, Luca Zelioli, First Counsellor, Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, delivered opening remarks.

Jim Grant, Former UNICEF Executive Director and Jim Himes, first Director of UNICEF's International Child Development Centre in front of the Ospedale degli Innocenti in Florence, Italy (Circa 1988)

Jim Grant, Former UNICEF Executive Director and Jim Himes, first Director of UNICEF’s International Child Development Centre in front of the Ospedale degli Innocenti in Florence, Italy (Circa 1988)

Inaugurated in 1988 as the UNICEF International Child Development Centre, with a broad mandate to contribute to an “emerging global ethic for children,” research quickly became a defining mission and the institution’s name soon evolved to Innocenti Research Centre, and finally to the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti.

“When we moved here these were turbulent years, the Berlin Wall was falling, adjustment in Africa was not working so there was a lost decade in Africa and Latin America and there was a big debate on how to finance health, education and nutrition in developing countries,” recalled Giovanni Andrea Cornia, UNICEF’s first Chief of Socio-Economic Policy at Innocenti (1989 – 1995). During years of global economic recession Innocenti produced a succession of important studies in Africa and Latin America which provided an evidence base for UNICEF’s global call for “adjustment with a human face.”

Following ratification of the Convention of the Rights of the Child, a range of research projects at Innocenti contributed significantly in shaping UNICEF’s adoption of the human rights-based approach to development. Innocenti pioneered much early work on child protection. Numerous studies focused on what were deemed “emerging issues” in the 1990’s such as child trafficking, children in conflict with the law and child labour.

Research on the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child conducted at Innocenti allowed UNICEF to explore aspects of children’s development which were considered sensitive or taboo subjects in various cultural and national contexts. According to Nigel Cantwell, child protection expert and former senior officer (1998–2003), Innocenti has explored themes leading the global discourse on children’s issues, often producing work which pushed a range of sensitive child rights issues into the mainstream of global programming and service delivery.

Sarah Cook (L) Director of the UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti introducing a panel of former Innocenti Directors and Senior Researchers, (L_R) Mehr Khan-Williamson, Nigel Cantwell, Giovanni Andrea Cornia and Gordon Alexander at the  UNICEF Innocenti 25th Anniversary Seminar in Florence, Italy.

Sarah Cook (L) Director of the UNICEF Office of Research – Innocenti introducing a panel of former Innocenti Directors and Senior Researchers, (L_R) Mehr Khan-Williamson, Nigel Cantwell, Giovanni Andrea Cornia and Gordon Alexander at the UNICEF Innocenti 25th Anniversary Seminar in Florence, Italy.

“Juvenile justice is an area where there is often a total lack of understanding as to what actually works in terms of preventing and responding to offending by young people,” said Cantwell. “Juvenile justice has become more integrated into UNICEF programming, and I think that Innocenti helped to pave the way for it to gradually move out of the sensitive issue area.”

Panellists highlighted the important benefits of a UNICEF research centre located apart from headquarters, empowered to pursue an independent research agenda.

Gordon Alexander, recently retired Director (2010–2013) pointed out Innocenti’s unique ability to take a long-term, multi-disciplinary approach to knowledge on children. “There are very few places in the world where research for children in all its dimensions actually comes together. I think that is something that is very special to Innocenti.”

In recent years, Innocenti has played a leading role in improving social and economic policy for vulnerable children in both poor and rich countries. The Innocenti Report Card series, based on league tables which compare child well-being among OECD nations, has risen in prominence to become one of UNICEF’s most visible flagship publications. Through the Report Card, Innocenti has expanded substantive advocacy for vulnerable children in the developed world with UNICEF’s network of National Committees.

Mehr Khan-Williamson, former Innocenti Director (1998–2000), reflected on the challenges she faced initiating the series. “Starting the Report Cards was not easy…these were Board Members, they were donor countries and we are an inter-governmental organization and not much can be said to those who are also feeding you. But the issues were essential and they had to be dealt with.”

Reflecting on the emergence of Innocenti’s current incarnation, Gordon Alexander recalled how the Executive Board defined its current mission. “UNICEF has always been right at the heart of research, in many areas. It was a tremendous user and a convener of research and occasionally it did brilliant pieces of research. But there was never a permanent home for research, and that is what gave rise to the idea of linking the work of Innocenti with the more global approach.”

25thAnniveBackdropToday at Innocenti UNICEF plays a critical evidence gathering and knowledge building role on a wide range of cutting-edge children’s issues. It is a leading centre on impact evaluation of cash transfers. It coordinates multi-country research on the drivers of violence affecting children. It plays a central role in adolescent well-being, child rights and the internet, child rights implementation, family and parenting support policy and multi-dimensional child poverty analysis.

A special 25th Anniversary e-publication “Children and Research at Innocenti: 25 years of UNICEF Commitment” was formally launched in both English and Italian at the Seminar. It is an invaluable small volume for anyone seeking the story of how UNICEF’s presence at Innocenti emerged and evolved over the last 25 years.

Follow me on Twitter: @dalerutstein

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

Por los sueños de mi hija

Desde muy temprano en la mañana, Selena, de diez años, y sus dos hermanas pequeñas comienzan a hacerse cargo de las tareas de la casa. Junto con algunas amigas del vecindario se dirigen después a la escuela, y en la tarde ayudan a cultivar maíz en el pequeño terreno que su familia tiene en su comunidad Tzotzil de Chiapas. Su mamá también trabaja muy duro en el campo, pero lo que obtienen del cultivo de la tierra no es suficiente porque no cuentan con las herramientas adecuadas y el terreno ya no es tan fértil como antes. Ante esta situación, el papá de Selena tendrá que alejarse de su familia para conseguir sustento.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

El papá de Selena hace planes para salir a buscar empleo que no encuentran en su comunidad, por ahora se está recuperando de una lesión y no puede trabajar como albañil, con lo que mantenía a su familia. “Aunque para mí es muy duro dejar a mi mujer y a mis hijas,” afirma inquieto, “pienso volver a salir en cuanto me recupere de la espalda, porque es la única forma que tengo de atender a mi familia y de mandar a la escuela a mis tres pequeñas”.

El papá de Selena sabe lo mucho que le gusta la escuela a su hija y recuerda que su gran sueño es ser doctora y ayudar a su comunidad.  Lo que más le preocupa es que su hija tendrá que tomar el autobús o vivir fuera para estudiar la secundaria.  Él preferiría no irse lejos de su familia, pero no hay otra opción, porque eso es lo que hace un papá para apoyar los sueños de su hija.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

UNICEF apoya comunidades indígenas para que todos los niños y las niñas tengan educación de calidad y el día de mañana contribuyan al desarrollo de sus comunidades. Así muchos niños pueden seguir estudiando y estar cerca de sus familias, porque con tu apoyo ayudamos a cumplir sus sueños.

 

Amaia López, cooperante de UNICEF México

Sígue a UNICEF México en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

©UNICEFMéxico/AzulPardavé

Los derechos de la infancia a través de los ojos de sus protagonistas

Para quienes trabajamos en UNICEF, participar en la 2ª edición del Concurso Colorea tus Derechos, fue una gran experiencia, nos alegra mucho habernos sumado nuevamente a la iniciativa de ISA Corporativo para impulsar el conocimiento y respeto de los derechos de las niñas, niños y adolescentes.

Este año recibimos más de ocho mil dibujos, las opiniones expresadas por quienes participaron nos permitieron contar con información a la que de otra manera difícilmente tendríamos acceso, quizá a través de una encuesta o de un estudio, pero no así como se recibió, de primera mano.

En los dibujos vimos escuelas y libros, médicos y hospitales, casas y familias, dibujos que reflejan los derechos de la niñez; pero también encontramos violencia, como la que observan muchos de los niños y niñas de México,  ojalá que las historias que se reflejan en estos últimos, se borren pronto, del papel y de la memoria, que pronto digamos que la falta de oportunidades, la violación de derechos y la pobreza son cosas del pasado de México.

Dibujo de Alma Mariana Hernández 1er  lugar

Dibujo de Alma Mariana Hernández 1er lugar

La selección de los dibujos y cómics finalistas y de los ganadores fue una tarea muy compleja, porque teníamos que elegir doce ganadores para premiarlos, pero en realidad todos y cada uno de los materiales que recibimos se merecía ganar porque refleja la opinión de una niña, niño o de adolescente, y cada una de ellas merece ser escuchada.

Dibujo de Juan Ramón Álvarez Bravo

Dibujo de Juan Ramón Álvarez Bravo

El propósito del  concurso fue  promover entre los niños, niñas y adolescentes el conocimiento y la conciencia de sus derechos para avanzar hacia una cultura en la que los conozcan y los exijan. Sobre todo porque por primera vez en México hay una Ley General de los Derechos de Niñas, Niños y Adolescentes y se trata de uno de los avances legislativos más significativos de México en los últimos 25 años en materia de derechos de la infancia,  y tendrá un impacto positivo en los 40 millones de niños, niñas y adolescentes que viven en el país.

©UNICEFMéxico/AzulPardavé

©UNICEFMéxico/AzulPardavé

María Teresa Chávez trabaja en el área de Comunicación de UNICEF México

Síguenos en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

Un gran movimiento por UNICEF y la lactancia

La mañana del 30 de abril de 2015 una copiosa lluvia hacía más pesado el tráfico matutino de la Ciudad de México. A eso de las 6:00 los pasillos de TV Azteca empezaron a inundarse con el ir y venir del staff de UNICEF ataviado con la reconocida camiseta negra con logo blanco. Ese sería el gran día, el día del Movimiento Azteca en favor de la lactancia materna.

En punto de las 7:00 el conductor estrella de Hechos AM, Jorge Zarza anunciaba el arranque del Movimiento Azteca número 86, que concluiría a las 23:00 hrs. con el cierre estelar a cargo del conductor  prime time de la cadena, Javier Alatorre.

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeñ

©UNICEFMéxico/LuisCedeñ

La experiencia de trabajar en televisión abierta a nivel nacional durante un día completo, significó una maravillosa oportunidad para promover en todo México la importancia de la lactancia materna.

El Movimiento Azteca es un esquema de Televisión Azteca que cada mes promueve la causa de una institución diferente con fines de abogacía y de recaudación de fondos. Este abril, por primera vez, UNICEF y la televisora, hicieron sinergias en favor de una causa por la salud y el bienestar materno infantil.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

Del 16 al 30 de abril se colocó en la programación de TV Azteca una serie de entrevistas con madres lactantes, funcionarios de UNICEF y otros voceros que promovieron los beneficios de la lactancia materna. También se colocaron llamados a la sociedad para que hiciera donativos que permitirán a UNICEF continuar impulsando la práctica de la lactancia en México.

El Movimiento Azteca de UNICEF por la lactancia materna, junto con una campaña mediática hicieron posible que el tema se colocara en la agenda y despertara el interés de diferentes actores para que el país deje de ser el último de América Latina, junto con la República Dominicana, en cuanto al índice de lactancia materna exclusiva durante los primeros seis meses de vida de los bebés.

 

Rocío Ortega es Oficial de Comunicación de UNICEF México

Síguenos en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

La leche materna también ayuda al crecimiento empresarial

  • Cada vez más empresas se convierten en promotoras de la lactancia materna por los grandes beneficios que obtienen

Los beneficios de la lactancia materna se extienden a toda la sociedad, incluyendo al entorno empresarial, ya que disminuye hasta un 35% las incidencias en salud en el primer año del bebé y reduce el ausentismo de las madres entre un 30% y un 70%. Además, una actitud positiva de las empresas hacia la lactancia materna promueve la lealtad, ayuda a la satisfacción laboral y eleva la productividad.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

La inversión para promover la lactancia puede variar de acuerdo con las características y tamaño de cada empresa, lo que sí está claro es que se trata de una inversión que reditúa. De acuerdo con estudios de la Organización Internacional del Trabajo y UNICEF, en promedio se obtiene un retorno de tres dólares por cada uno invertido.

Investigaciones desarrolladas en Canadá, Finlandia, Suecia y Estados Unidos confirman  que las empresas que han incursionado en medidas favorables a las familias presentan reducciones significativas en la rotación del personal, en costos de capacitación y en ausentismo laboral.

UNICEF invita a todas las empresas a apoyar la lactancia materna con cuatro sencillas prácticas: asegurar el compromiso formal de todos colaboradores de la empresa; dar suficiente tiempo de maternidad y considerar los tiempos que requerirán las madres para extraerse la leche; capacitar y sensibilizar a todo su personal; y asegurar espacios adecuados e higiénicos conocidos como lactarios.

Para apoyar #SíaLaLactancia, dona en www.donaunicef.org.mx

Daniel González es Oficial de Comunicación de UNICEF México

Síguenos en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

La leche materna es el alimento perfecto: salva vidas

Recuerdo que hace años era común ver en parques, avenidas y otros espacios públicos a madres sosteniendo a sus bebés mientras les daban el pecho. Sin duda se trataba de un momento especial por el vínculo de cariño y protección que se establecía entre la madre y el hijo, el cual los uniría por siempre; pero especialmente porque amamantar significa hacer algo muy importante por la salud y el desarrollo de los hijos.

Lo recuerda la prestigiosa revista científica The Lancet en un interesante estudio sobre lactancia materna que concluye que la leche materna mejora el rendimiento escolar, aumenta el coeficiente intelectual en el adulto y se relaciona con unos ingresos altos en el futuro.

Como madre, y como mujer que he tenido que dar el pecho en lugares remotos, sé lo complicado que es compatibilizar esta sana costumbre con las responsabilidades de un trabajo. Más aún con la complejidad de la vida en lugares poco amigables para la maternidad, como aquellos en los que he contado con la fortuna de trabajar con UNICEF en favor de la niñez más vulnerable.

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

©UNICEFMéxico/MauricioRamos

En Tailandia y en Nepal, donde tuve el privilegio de vivir los primeros minutos de la maternidad, tenía que realizar largos trayectos en medio del tráfico caótico, entre coches que deambulan sin orden, o cargando a mi hijo en la espalda mientras atravesaba las elevadas montañas nepalíes, y casi siempre bajo las inclemencias del tiempo, lo que le daba a ese momento tan especial de amamantar a mi bebé, un sabor agridulce.

La vida era dura, pero yo estaba convencida de que a pesar del entorno difícil, darles pecho a mis hijos era lo más valioso que podía hacer por ellos. Era la mayor muestra de amor, y el mayor gesto de protección que podía tener con ellos.

El apoyo de mi marido y de UNICEF, donde trabajo, fue fundamental para facilitar esta tarea. Su apoyo en los momentos en los que creía que no valía la pena fue esencial para seguir dándole el pecho a mis hijos. Me hubiera arrepentido mucho si no lo hubiera hecho, porque sé que la salud de mis hijos se hubiera resentido si no se hubieran alimentado de leche materna.

Por eso, no deja de angustiarme ver los bajos índices de  lactancia materna en México, donde el promedio de lactancia materna exclusiva es de 14.4%. Estos datos se asemejan a la de muchos países pobres del África Subsahariana.

Cada año nacen en México alrededor de 2,400,000  niños y niñas, pero sólo 1 de cada 7 goza de los beneficios de la leche materna.

©UNICEFMéxico/DailoAlli

©UNICEFMéxico/DailoAlli

Me cuesta trabajo pensar que una madre no quiera que sus hijos tengan acceso a esta fórmula perfecta, que además es gratis, y  ayuda a prevenir enfermedades, malnutrición y la obesidad.

Quiero pensar que la razón por la cual no amamantan a sus bebés es porque desconocen los efectos positivos de la leche materna, por eso me empeño en que desde UNICEF ayudemos a todas las madres de México a que conozcan los beneficios de la lactancia materna exclusiva al menos durante los seis primeros meses de vida.

Sin embargo, soy consciente también de que la sociedad y las instituciones en la mayoría de los casos, no son amigables para con las madres lactantes y de que no existen políticas públicas y leyes que las apoyen.

Esto influye en que tan solo 1 de cada 10 mujeres que trabajan, amamanten a sus bebés. El resto les dan formulas artificiales.

Desde UNICEF enfocamos nuestros esfuerzos para que médicos, enfermeras, profesionales, madres, padres, hacedores de políticas públicas y todos los implicados sepan lo importante que es promover la alimentación exclusiva de los niños con leche materna los primeros seis meses de vida (desde la primera hora de su nacimiento) y combinada con otros alimentos hasta los 2 años de vida,  en vez de  acudir a productos que no son tan buenos como la leche materna.

©UNICEFMéxico/RQuintos

©UNICEFMéxico/RQuintos

Desde este espacio hago un llamado para que creemos conciencia de lo importante que es apoyar a las madres para que regresen a la práctica de la lactancia materna. Hagámoslo por  la salud de nuestros hijos, porque ellos –quienes representan el presente y el futuro de México-, deben crecer sanos y ser  capaces de desarrollar todo su potencial.

Porque las niñas y niños tienen derecho a crecer sanos y fuertes. Capaces y hábiles para vivir la vida que tienen derecho a vivir.

Para apoyar #SíaLaLactancia, dona en www.donaunicef.org.mx

Isabel Crowley es la Representante de UNICEF México

Síguenos en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube

U-Reporters en México.

La Innovación no es magia

La innovación no se lleva a cabo por arte de magia, es un arte, y como en todo arte, hay fundamentos para ayudar al éxito de la misma.

Unicef está aprovechando la tecnología móvil y el uso de la información en tiempo real, para mejorar la vida de los niños en todo el mundo. Al día de hoy se desarrollan cerca de 270 proyectos, y U-Report es uno de los más importantes.

Hemos lanzado la iniciativa U-report en México. Un innovador sistema con el que los jóvenes tienen la posibilidad de contarnos, en tiempo real, a través de Twitter sus preocupaciones, intereses y opiniones. Hoy probamos el sistema con scouts de la Ciudad de México y alumnos de la Preparatoria 8 de la UNAM.

U-Reporters en México.

U-Reporters en México.

Nuestra representante, Isabel Crowley y Chris Fabian del área de Innovación de UNICEF, saludaron en directo a nuestros primeros U-Reporters.

Lo más importante de este lanzamiento, es que en UNICEF México, por fin podemos acercarnos a la juventud de manera más directa, sin ningún obstáculo. Escuchar las voces de el objeto de nuestro trabajo, es lo que nos da mayor entusiasmo y una oportunidad única para focalizar nuestros esfuerzos en lo que ellos realmente quieren y necesitan.

Dibujos de los primeros U-Reporters en México.

Dibujos de los primeros U-Reporters en México.

Conviértete en U-Reporter, porque tu voz cuenta.

Sigue a @UReportMexico

Luis Cedeño trabaja en el área de Comunicación en UNICEF México

Síguenos en:

Twitter

Facebook

Instagram

Youtube